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Kurdistan and the Kurds


Auteur : Jawad Mella
Éditeur : Xlibris Date & Lieu : 2015, London
Préface : Pages : 372
Traduction : ISBN : 978-1-4990-9653-8
Langue : AnglaisFormat : 150x230 mm
Code FIKP : Liv. Ang. Mel. Kur. 4873Thème : Général

Présentation
Table des Matières Introduction Identité PDF
Kurdistan and the Kurds


Kurdistan and the Kurds

Jawad Mella

Xlibris


Since the end of World War I, the Kurds have had no national rights, and their country Kurdistan was divided and occupied by Iran, Iraq, Turkey, Syria and former Soviet Union as an international colony, and the Kurds have been prosecuted, massacred, assimilated and denied the very basic human rights. Whether the Kurds are demanding full independence or a more limited autonomy or extension of electricity for their villages, in these States the Kurdish people face severe restrictions and harsh oppression. Here is some of what happened to western Kurdistan as an example to the rest of Kurdistan.



The author of this book, the scholar Jawad Mella is a known Kurdish politician. He was born into a Kurdish family thirsty for freedom and emancipation from injustice; an educated family of literature and science. He grew up within this honourable family and carried out political activities since young age so, he became accustomed to imprisonment and detentions.
Jawad Mella was the first who called for a formation of a Kurdistan government in exile and the Kurdistan National Congress in 1985 working to achieve the independence for Kurdistan, that elementary right that does not need any evidence or proof.

 



FOREWORD


The Kurdish nation is the fourth largest nation in the Middle East and the largest nation in the world without a national state. Today the Kurds are more than 50 million; their homeland is called Kurdistan, which means “country of the Kurds”. Kurdistan is not the name of a state, but rather a land, which in the 20th century was obligatorily divided among five states (Turkey, Iran, Iraq, Syria and Red Kurdistan in the former Soviet Union).
- The Kurdish language is belongs to the Indo-European group.

Kurdistan extends from the Caucasus to the Mediterranean Sea and from there to the Gulf. A part of it lies in Mesopotamia, which is regarded as the “cradle of humanity”. In this region, high cultures such as Mithraism or the Sun Cult already existed thousands of years ago. There was Buddhism; there was Mazdaism, the religion of the Zoroastrians which dedicated itself to the relation between good and evil as a dualism of the nature of life. There was also the religion of Mani or Manichaeus, i.e. Manichaeism, which symbolically transmitted the dualism of nature into the existence of light and darkness symbolising good and bad. There was (and still is today) Judaism, Christianity, and also Islam and Bahaism in Kurdistan, and last not least several truly syncretistic religions like the Yazidis (Ezidis), Yarsan, Alawis, Shabbak, Haqqa. Brought into the world by the Kurdish nation these syncretistic religions are an undeniable part of the Kurdish culture which is pluralistic, vibrant and varied.

Kurdistan used to be, like all the existing countries in the Middle East, under the rule of the Ottoman Empire. In the aftermath of the First World War when the Ottoman Empire disintegrated (1918) it seemed the most reasonable solution that Kurdistan should be granted national independence. Although the Treaty of Sevres (1920) did provide the creation of an independent Kurdish State, but when Mustafa Kamal became the Turkish leader he refused to accept this. A second treaty of Lausanne was signed in 1923, and Kurdistan was not mentioned in it. Then in a Franco-Turkish agreement the railway line between Mosul (a city in Southern Kurdistan) and Aleppo (a city in Western Kurdistan) became the border line between Turkey and Syria. The result of these agreements, in which the Kurds had no saying whatsoever, was the division of Kurdistan. The Kurds have never accepted this, so they started their continuous struggles against the regimes occupying Kurdistan, namely Iraq, Turkey, Syria, Iran, and the former Soviet Union. These artificial states since then have practised the most repressive policies in the history of mankind against the Kurds.

Since the end of World War I, the Kurds have had no national rights, and their country Kurdistan was divided and occupied as an international colony, and the Kurds have been prosecuted, massacred, assimilated and denied the very basic human rights. Whether the Kurds are demanding full independence or a more limited autonomy or extension of electricity for their villages, in these States the Kurdish people face severe restrictions and harsh oppression.

Here is some of what happened to western Kurdistan as an example to the rest of Kurdistan:

Jawad Mella
London 21/3/2015



The full text of the book

(A Study of Al-Jazeera Province from Ethnic, Social and Political Aspects)

Written in 1962 by the racist Arab intelligence service officer Muhammad Talab Hilal

Introduction (1)


I would like to admit in advance that this study has defects in details and some in its broad line and the reasons for this is the following:

1 - The lack of enough sources for research as there are no objectives and serious studies that explains things for the ignorant Al-Jazeera province, which could be read scientifically and thoroughly.

2 - The few sources that I managed to get are more like reports than studies, as they treat a concrete situation or describe an urgent incident away from its circumstances.

3 - It was my own experience and practice and what I gained from those who have sufficient experience regarding the area that involved the most in this study.

.....

 




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